Holiday Fiesta Market

Holiday Fiesta Market

We are hosting our first 🎉 HOLIDAY FIESTA MARKET 🎉 inspired in the Mexican Holiday Posadas!! 
Start your holiday shopping with Mexican bites & drinks while supporting amazing Latina owned businesses in DC!

- Maizopes ($5) & Tamales ($4) by Manos de Maiz, 
- $8 Cocktails by Cotton & Reed including: Spiked Mexican Hot Chocolate 🍹
- Jewelry by Lalalu Mexican Art 💎
- Handmade scarfs made with organic cotton by Casa Flor Ixcaco- Woven
- Handmade woven wall art by Argentine artist Araceli Muñoz
- Colorful and unique Illustrations by La Horchata 🎨
- Handmade piñatas available for purchase and if weather lets us, we'll break a Coco themed colorful piñata! 🎉

Free Entrance. Food, drinks, and crafts are available for purchase!

Mexico in a Bottle

Mexico in a Bottle

Back in May, Manos de Maiz participated at the best event fully dedicated to celebrate Mezcal and Mexican gastronomy in  D.C. We worked together with La Cocina VA to share the amazing flavors of heritage corn and Mexican street food. 

Manos de Maiz featured at Washington City Paper

Manos de Maiz featured at Washington City Paper

Authentic Mexican Food is Still Hard to Find in D.C. Do Washingtonians Even Care?

Joahna Hernandez, former manager at Cafe Oaxaca in Adams Morgan, makes traditional Mexican tortillas from scratch. Almost no one in D.C. is doing this besides Hernandez—probably because it’s a shitload of work.

“You have to treat the corn with a lot of love to get it how you want it,” says Hernandez, who begins by boiling imported Mexican corn kernels in an alkaline solution before letting them sit overnight. Come morning the real slog begins: making the masa, or corn dough, that will be made into tortillas and then lightly fried. 

The tortilla might be the quickest way to separate the real from the fake in “authentic” Mexican restaurants, which are relatively scant in the District despite all the so-called “hip-Mex” spots opening lately. Which raises a few questions: What qualifies as authentic Mexican food? Is there so little in D.C. because there are so few Mexicans here, compared to, say, Salvadorans? Do District eaters even care?

 

 

POP-UP ALERT

POP-UP ALERT

Sundays are for vintage shopping and indulging in Mexican food!